Skip to main content

About your Search

English 36
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
is something like this. >> stuff that's worth it is always hard. civil rights movement was hard. >> okay. is that a fair comparison? we're going to report and you're going to decide. how does the "duck dynasty" family celebrate christmas? the ladies, miss kay, cory, missy and jessica join us live next from west monroe, louisiana. ♪ ♪ before using her new bank of america credit card, which rewards her for responsibly managing her card balance. before receiving $25 toward her balance each quarter for making more than ht on time each month. tracey got the bankamericard better balance rewards credit card, which fits nicely with everything else in life she has to balance. that's the benefit of responsibility. apply online or visit a bank of america near you. at any minute... could be a victim of fraud. most people don't even know it. fraud could mean lower credit scores, higher loan rates... ...and maybe not getting the car you want. it's a problem waiting to hapn. check your credit score, check your credit repo, at america's numb one provider of online credit rorts an
, entertainment industry, but a and the civil-rights movement conspired to put a transparent the innocent man in prison -- present for the rest of his life. i had to ask myself why? and what i have chosen to do is to ask for basic questions why did this happen in? the second question is how transparent was george zimmerman innocent? how did these forces succeed to bring zimmerman to a trial and get him arrested? and fourth, what was the consequence of trying an innocent man and a county where he could expect a fair trial? let me start with the wise and i have to go back to the year 1920. the rest of to an italian-american gentleman arrested for the murder of a payroll clerk also an italian-american. they went to trial 1921 he was sentenced 15 years in prison nobody said anything about it that later they went to trial and had an interpreter and due process and went through the trial both were convicted in both transparently guilty. and in 19211 of the reporters the guys in this case throwback to his editor and said not much here. just a couple of logs in the jam then the aclu picks up the case
than that. last year they were making san francisco the rights to civil council city, the city of gideon. there are civil cases, eviction cases, family law cases where the consequences, the results followed in court are almost as severe to what gideon faced and what people face in criminal cases. what we recognize at the outset of the supervisors proclamation is part inspirational, our leaders in the community have rallied around it and the bar association and our firms have taken on more conviction cases. later we'll be holding an event to thank people in these positions and so please stay tuned about that. in the meantime let's focus on gideon and the public defenders role. i would say if there is ever a time and place to turn the tied and to bring the &m music back to gideon's trumpet. we thank you and look forward to a great day. thank you. [ applause ] >> about a year-and-a-half go we saw one of the most dramatic shifts when the state took funding and reallocated to local and housing for state prisoners. our next speaker chief probation officers not only in san francisco
a dream. some say nelson mandela dreamed it. he became one of the greatest civil rights icons of the last 50 years and it cost him almost three decades of his life in a jail cell. vanita on the man who earned the admiration of millions. >> and one wonders what must be passing through mr. mandela's mind at this moment. >> after 27 years in prison, nelson mandela walked into freedom. against all odds, the leader of a rebellion became the leader of national unity. mandela's decade-long rebellion turned him into a freedom fighter, an international hero. >> i fought against white domination. i have fought for every family. >> mandela was born into a privileged family. he supported nonviolence. he became a lawyer and opened the first african law firm. in 1960, mandela turned militant. >> there are many people who feel that it is useless for us to continue talking nonviolence. >> mandela loved up to his name, troublemaker, repeatedly challenging authority. he was convicted of sabotage and conspiracy to overthrow the government and sentence to life in prison. he was cut off from the outside
of the apartheid foe and civil rights icon, nelson mandela. we continue that, just ahead. ♪ we know we're not the center of your life, but we'll do our best to help you connect to what is. ♪ [ male announcer ] laura's heart attack didn't come with a warning. today her doctor has her on a bayer aspirin regimen to help reduce the risk of another one. if you've had a heart attack, be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. you know that, right? uh-huh. i know this hasn't always been easy for you. and i'm really happy that you're in my life too. ♪ it's just like yours, mom! [ jane ] behind every open heart is a story. tell yours with my open hearts collection at kay jewelers, the number one jewelry store in america. there are millions of reasons to give one, but the message is always the same. keep your heart open... and love will always find its way in. thank you. thank you. ♪ every kiss begins with kay thank you. ♪ feed them natural and healthy blue™ buffalo, like family, featuring lifesource® bits that are now enhanced with our super 7 package of natu
this is a federal civil rights complaint under section 1983. do you see the elements of that kind of case here? >> i really do. whether or not you can prevail, it's a long road to prevail but in these cases where you have police officers aking under color of authority with clear information that should indicate that the people that they are about to arrest have not committed a crime it's when you cross that barrier of judgment that the courts have taken a dim view of that kind of police conduct. if the students and coach told the police officers and then they effectuated an arrest, those are facts that can prevail in civil right cases in federal courts. >> in a case like this, is it the coach who would have more credibility than the students or is it the combination of what you can prove to be the actual truth of the students' position which is that they are waiting if a bus which is scheduled and it's a school bus. the combination of the credibility factors there, how would you weigh them? >> you would hope that the students' statements in and of themselves would be enough. it's 8:30 in the morning
officers and then they effectuated an arrest, those are facts that can prevail in civil right cases in federal courts. >> in a case like this, is it the coach who would have more credibility than the students or is it the combination of what you can prove to be the actual truth of the students' position which is that they are waiting if a bus which is scheduled and it's a school bus. the combination of the credibility factors there, how would you weigh them? >> you would hope that the students' statements in and of themselves would be enough. it's 8:30 in the morning on the day before thanksgiving on a quiet street. their statements should be enough. you add in their coach. that's a troubling case. if i was a law enforcement in rochester i would be thinking about issuing apologies and dismissing charges. >> thank you very much for joining us tonight. >> thank you. >> coming up, a 13-year-old gives a speech about marriage equality and he does it at his bar mitzvah. [ male announcer] surprise -- you're having triplets. [ babies crying ] surprise -- your house was built on an ancient b
him among some of the biggest civil right ises advocates. brown hosted him in his civil rights tour after he got out of prison. >> mandela came here in 1990, and 70,000 packed into the coliseum to see their hero and receive thanks for his activism. >> it is you, the people of the bay area, who have given me and my dedication hopes to continue to prosper. >> the bay area choir who performed for him in south africa will be live at 6:30. >>> the man who paid a lot of money to combat -- tenure and the mark he leaves behind. >> reporter: the so-called supercop is back in new york. the mayor elect named william braton the job he had under giuliani. >> this is a beacon of light for the rest of world. >> reporter: his record of cleaning up crime was what attracted the oakland officials, paying him $250,000 to tell them how to tackle crime here. a year-long contract job that ended a month ago. >> i think what bill did was that he came in and he watched how we were implementing different things, from time to time, our crime analysis. even though you can do the form of it, do you do the heart
of apartheid south africa. they struck a deal where by civil rights and democracy came immediately. property rights were respected. a truth of reconciliation commission established under archbishop tutu which allowed south africans of all races to confront their past, but without recriminations that would have made relations poisonous. which was independence, freedom and democracy and equality for all south africans. i think that's really the example of his statesman ship and his vision. >> absolutely. south africa could never have gotten there without all those things you just pointed out. thanks so much. >> years ago, you in new york had an experience to spend time with nelson mandela. >> i did. there was a town hall meeting, i helped book hundreds of people in harlem who wanted to come when his first visit here in 1990, when nelson mandela came and i was so struck by his understated, yet ree gal presence and to listen to him speak, he was very unpolitically correct. he didn't shy away from them, but just to be around somebody who personified forgiveness was a very special experience. >> a
hard. the civil rights movement was hard. giving me women the right to vo, that was hard. making sure we had the right to organize, that was hard. it's never been busy how we do business in this country. >> tony, the president has a wig problem. even with young people with startling statistics out of harvard, they came out with numbers. 39% of so-called millennials, 18 to 29-year-olds, only 39% approve of the affordable care act. 20%, just 20% of those polled intend to enroll. almost half do not intend to enroll. that could be bad news. >> mike, thank you ♪ >> mark morgan is here with the headlines in sports and big news for major college football. >> reporter: the prosecutor looking into sexual assault allegations against florida state quarterback jameis winston said that his investigation is complete, and he will announce his findings tomorrow afternoon. now william meggs said its up to prosecutors if there is enough evidence to charge winston and prosecutors have to decide if they charge is there a reasonable chance of conviction. that announcement is expected tomorrow. meanwhile
in charge. we saw that here in this country post-civil rights movement where -- there's a wonderful book i think about often about a small town and southern georgia, the civil rights movement came late to the county and those who sort of really were in opposition to the sheriff and ultimate power, how difficult, difficulty they had once they had any kind of power. and so i guess i wonder why, what happened? >> it's the big question in a place like this. obviously, people came back from 30 years in exile come in the case of the successor to nelson mandela in 1999. mostly living in london. and all of a sudden in charge of running a country that he didn't know that he left as a young man of 19, coming back and needing to run the place that was bankrupt the he described former president described walking into the office in union buildings after being sworn in and finding nothing. no computers, no pencils, no pins. no paper, and which to manage this developing country. so i think part of it is that that generation came back from exile to a country they did know. and that the presidency is in ha
who became a towering symbol for civil rights for strength, for unity.
. stateside, a yuounger generatio of american civil rights leaders is reflecting on the legacy of the man and how he inspired them. one of them downing me now from washington, d.c. former president and ceo of the naacp, ben jellis. i'd like to know when nelson mandela first got on your radar. what was the first context in which you learned about him and when you first saw him in person. >> you know, the first conversation was with my mom explaining to me why we couldn't drink coke and we couldn't get gas from the shell station and really talking about how similar the struggle that was happening then in south africa was to what she had gone through as a young person in this country. the first time i saw him was he was doing a tour when he got out of prison. it was 1989. he came to the coliseum in the east bay. i and tens of thousands of people were all gathered there. i recall pushing my way up to the front. you know, for us, we were used to having black leaders assassinated in their prime and spending the rest of our lives wondering what could have been, what would have been. and with him
believes that shooting was unjustified and they filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against both the deputy and the department. the santa rosa police department is investigating that shooting. the county board of supervisors meeting begins at 8:30 this morning and along with beginning to assign people to this community and law enforcement task force, the board of supervisors also are expected to decide on whether to explore the establishment of a memorial park there at the site where andy lopez was shot and killed. we're live this morning in santa rosa, alex savidge news tuesday channel 2 news. >>> time now 6:45. a car salesman in hayward still stunned after a man posing as a potential buyer stole a luxury suv and drove off the lot. the man and another friend walked into the lot of empire auto sunday afternoon, said they were interested in the 2004 range rover, wanted to take it for a test drive. the salesman said he asked for a driver's license first and when one of the men walked away to get it the other man shoved him, jumped into the suv, and sped off. >> i was shocked, you k
. ♪ >>> this morning, the world wakes to the news that a joint of human and civil rights is gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force, reve revered, forever changing history. >> recognize that apartheid has no future. >> he spent nearly three decades in prison, emerging to become the first black president of south africa. a father figure to his people. and to millions around the world. this morning, new reaction from every corner of the world. >> i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. >> right now on "america this morning," abc news remembers
with transforming a country out of apartheid and considered one of the great civil rights leaders. tributes to him are coming in many forms. the white house flag will fly at half-staff through mon. last night they were half-staff at the state capital. here in california in sacramento. california was one of the leaders of the movement and discouraged people from investing in south africa. nelson mandela is trending. a group of pilot whales stranded in the everglades in florida back at sea also trending. lebron james co-starring with kevin hart in a comedy. and tgif, thank god it's friday. and winter storm across the country people are waking up to bitter cold. and you can follow us anytime at #cbssf. >>> cold snow and ice is the weather plaguing the country now from the lone star state to lake erie millions of people are in a deep freeze. as marlie hall reports the weather is brutal and dangerous dangerous. >>> reporter: people are scraping ice off their cars as freezing rain falls across parts of texas. a layer of slush and ice is making the roads dangerous. it's all part of a wintry blast that's
. it started with jesse helms. i rest my case. >> and strom thurmond. >> because after the civil rights act of 1964 was passed, they were very irate that the democratic party was becoming inclusive in all kinds of ways, especially racial. they started to -- 8000 fundamentalist baptist churches -- they took over the republican party levers of power gradually, so now you cannot get through the primaries to get into the general election as a smart, centrist conservative whatever, a perfectly sensible person. it is so dangerous to have one of our two parties controlled by extremists. of course, we get mad at the democrats. i am mad at the democrats every minute. then you find yourself voting for this other party. here's my plan. my plan is that we do what the right-wing democrats did and we go to the local caucuses and so on. even i am willing to look republican. i will take off this belt. [laughter] [applause] >> do you like my jacket? >> yes. we will infiltrate the caucuses. that is what they did. we will take them over. in four years, you will have a chaotic and terrible republican conventio
programs that do not respect basic civil rights and civil liberties. we need to stay vigilant in our fight for respect in this country and that has been one of our themes. whether it's on the budget as our colleague, mr. scott, just talked about, or a plethora of bills that have been brought forward by individual members. an essential to the f.y. 2014 budget that has been worked on by the congressional black caucus, which reduces the budget and creates millions of jobs in a fair and balanced way. let me just close by talking about one final area, mr. speaker, that we as members of this body need to stay focused on and that's jobs and growing the economy. in my home state of nevada, we still have a stubbornly high unemployment rate above the national average. despite improvements in certain sectors, there's far too many nevadans who are still looking for work. many who have been out of work for now more than a year, year and a half, going on two years, and i know it's part of the budget debate that will occur between now and january 15, will be this discussion about extending unemployment b
and the british refer to as "the riot on king street"? >> all right, i know fort sumter was the civil war, and the alamo was somewhere down in texas, and texas wasn't around during the revolutionary war, i don't think, so the burning of washington and the boston massacre. name that shifts the blame. all right, i'm gonna go with... jumping the question 'cause i'm not sure. >> it's my boo. >> [laughter] >> you gonna hit me with my whole move. i was all like, "what are you gonna do? oh, you gonna jump the question." so you jumped over. not really sure, decided to jump over it. >> not really sure, yeah. >> all right, it is now out of play. you thinkin' it was possibly "b," 'cause that's the one you would have, if you would have guessed. >> yes, if i would have guessed. >> what is the correct answer? it is indeed "b," the boston massacre. again, it's double money week. hopefully this money is small. what'd she jump over? oh, well, jumped over $1,000. that's all right. when we come back, clarice is going for her double money question. millionaire in just a second. it's so much more than coffee.
life. >> reporter: president obama paid homage to a civil rights icon. >> let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands and bent the mark of the moral universe toward justice. >> reporter: queen elizabeth remembered his efforts. his legacy is the peaceful south africa we see today, she said. a glittering film premiere in london attended by the royal couple and two of mandela's daughters celebrated the movie of his life, "long walk to freedom." his death was announced as the credits rolled. >> extremely tragic news. we are just reminded what an extraordinary man he was. >> reporter: mandela will have a state funeral but it was his leading by example that helped so many. >> we lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings any of us will share time with here on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> reporter: this country is now in an official state of mourning. his body will lie in state for viewing and a funeral is expected. matt, back to you. >> richard, thanks so muc
itself has caused harms, particularly in civil rights-type cases. but where there is a private party that is alleged to have forgot the government, -- alleged to have ripped off the government, that is the false claims act. host: a few issues that the false claims act. i -- that the false claims act prohibits. host: that according to the justice department. we are talking to colette matzzie about the false claims act, some of its history, and some of its applications today. matthew is up next on our line for democrats. thanks for calling "washington journal." caller: i would like to ask about the whistleblower law. can it be used for the tarp and banks that are too big to fail and can it be used for iraq, afghanistan, and syria, the eu building that we did, and the $12 trillion deficit caused? guest: well, in that context, taking the war context first, there is -- you know, there have been more cases, there will continue to be more cases. it is likely there are cases under investigation. ae typical were case involves private defense contractor who has submitted a claim to the united
was really sad. >> miami gardens police chief won't say much about sampson's case, due to the pending civil rights lawsuit filed against his department. the department has conducted it's own investigation since last year. the chief says the department uses data, not profiling, to fight crime. >> you got a black chief, african-american chief, african-american mayor, african-american city manager. that does not make sense. a predominantly trick american city, i know the department didn't do anything wrong. >> it's an aggressive policing approach, focusing on small crime like trespassing to prevent bigger ones. the department's zero tolerance policing program is effective. miami gardens was the 15t 15th most violent city of its size, last year dropped to the 40th. >> police must take con terrence about racial profiling seriously or lose local trust i don't by abusing the rights of so many people systematically, you alienate communities and this is a breeding ground for crime. >> dis enchanted, sampson now looks at the police as a potential jailer, not a protector. >> they have spent about $20,
people wanted justice, and especially coming out at the end of the civil rights movement, a lot of people in the united states were thinking where do i put my energy now. the idea and the images that were coming out of south africa with rewards to the apartheid movement really ignited their imagination and the passion for justice. >> can't wait to see the film. >> thank you. >> thank you for being with us. the film is the 12 disciples of nelson mandela. it is about the people who were behind the scenes of the movement. here's what we can expect next in south africa. nelson mandela will be laid to rest during the official state funeral taking place in a 10 day period. tomorrow begins the memorial service, open to the public. the government are he can specking 80,000 people to be in attendance there. from wednesday to friday, international visitors will view mandelle la's remains. his body will be taken to the eastern cape where the ruling party will then pay their final respects. sunday, december 15 will bring the 10 day funeral to an end. dignitaries scheduled to attend, 71 expected to be
the modern mother of the civil rights movement, rosa parks. this past sunday, we celebrated the 58th anniversary of rosa parks refusing to give up her seat on that bus in montgomery, alabama. i am so proud to stand here from the great state of ohio because it was the great state of ohio that was the first state in this nation to name december 1 rosa parks day. on thursday and friday of this week in our district, we will bring people from all over the state to pay tribute to her. and we will bring in more than 600 little children who will learn about civil rights and understand the value of working together. the last day, 1955, she started something larger than herself. she stood -- she sat down so we could stand up. mr. speaker, it is my honor to be a part of the legislation that created december 1 in ohio as rosa parks day. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speake
a positive environment for civil society and to protect the rights of all ukrainians to express their views on the country's future in a constructive and peaceful manner. violence and intimidation should have no place in today's ukraine. to support the aspirations of the ukrainian people to achieve a prosperous european democracy. european integration is the surest course of economic growth and strengthening ukraine's democracy. thanks very much. >> here at the end of this briefing you can see it in its entirety on c-span that -- you can wor. live coverage here on c-span again now coming back at 5:00 p.m. eastern. we posted a question on our facebook page asking about your thoughts on congressional prod uctivity. a couple of responses. michael says, when you elect people who are contentious of government, you'll get that government. tracy offers the, hail hail term limits, hourly pay. congress has to me perks, and privileges. you can post your thoughts at, . coming up on c-span2, french opposition leader john prince walkup a -- will talk about his recent nuclear deal wit
. >>> the senate judiciary committee chairman patrick leahy will deliver a speech on thursday on civil liberty, national security, and human rights. you can see the remarks live at 1:15 eastern on c-span2. >>> as you walk in, there are tables in front with a bunch of pamphlets. prior to entering the gun show. about how the government is trying to take away the guns and obama is doing this and obamacare is terrible. and so those are the guys i wanted to talk to. they were quites with the leaflet. the ideas. so i said to them, like, is this your stuff? and yeah, who are you? i'm academic. i'm a researcher and i'm doing a research on these organizations. these ideas trying to understand the guys. and i study men who believe this stuff. and they looked at me suspiciously and asked me question. and i said, look, here is what i am. i don't get it. so what here is my job. i want to understand how you see the world. i want to understand your world view. it is -- look, you will not convince me. ly not convince you. that's off the table. what is on the table i want to understand why you think the way yo
the community with leaders pushing towards charges for the officer. the lopez family has filed a civil lawsuit. check out your morning commute with leyla gulen right now. >> we have a stalled vehicle along 80. if you're traveling along the westbound direction at carlton boulevard, you will find it in the center lanes. major backups from highway 4. for drive time traffic we have high wind advisories for the bay bridge and san mateo bridge. but look at how long it's going to take you on the golden gate headed from the tunnels into san francisco, 16 minutes, kristen. >> leyla, >>> a winter weather advisory for lake tahoe. up to four inches of snow expected by this afternoon. our highs today for the bay area, mid to upper 50s. my accuweather seven-day forecast, chill overnight with freeze warnings that will exte ♪ >>> you're looking at the amazing britney spears. a friend of this show, by the way. her music video, the latest smash single. and today is a huge day for britney fans everywhere. the album is finally out. it's called "britney jean," her eighth studio album. and we were with britney, f
people who make the civil war chest set or whatever. right? it's like a lead list. >> it's for your own good. >> the "los angeles times" piece says they were shocked. they didn't even complete the application process and they were getting phone calls. take heart in peter levy. he says, i can imagine some people may be upset but i can see some people will be comforted and relieved to get help navigating the website. >> your average sleazy marketer knows he's a sleazy marketer operating over a space above a starbucks. these people are doing it because they feel they have a moral right to do it. you ought to be grateful they're giving away your information to no one you've never heard of. >> it's okay for big government to do it but not mom and pop shops who have to adhere to the do not call list. >> or the do not e-mail list or canned spam act. >> it doesn't apply to the government. >> it's all because they're trying to make their deadline. that's the arg gurmt that cover california is making, too, hey, we have these deadlines for enrollment numbers and we're behind schedule so we have to
joe has really led to the most exciting three hours that you can find on television every day in civil discourse and a place where people can really get a lot of different points of view. let's figure out the room. first of all how many republicans here today, looking for the right path? >> we have got a few. >> how many democrats? c. yeah. >> it's "msnbc." >> how many independents max? this is our show. this is morning joe lies. >> it really is. it's all about friday, friday of independence and it starts with an mika and myself. as you know i'm a conservative from the deep south and mika is a liberal from the northeast. make a's dad is very excited rand u.s. foreign policy for years. [applause] you may be familiar with my dad's work to matt. he ran little league baseball. [applause] i was raised in the southern baptist church across the deep south and he of course was raised as a young marxist in the greater manhattan area. >> thank you very much. how many republicans voted for obama here? >> nobody's going to admit that. >> stand up. stand up. show yourself proudly. [applause] i didn
of the broken escalator, the queen's d.a. dropped the case. >> they would do the right thing and return the 5$500 in this case. >> reporter: when a retailer orders a suspected shoplifter to pay out of pocket, it's a civil demand. some say innocent customers are paying up even though they did nothing wrong, just to avoid legal consequences. sometimes stores send letters straight to a suspect's home. >> it frightens people. they pay whatever to make it go away. >> reporter: they have sent out more than a million collection letters. a recent lawsuit called the firm a letter mill that intimidates them into paying sums of money when retailer haves no intention of suing them. palmer did not respond. >> the majority of shoppers and consumers are honest. >> dan reynolds works for check point systems and help retailers battle shoplifting. stores aggressively pursue thieves for the benefit of everyone. u.s. households pay $300 a year because merchandise theft inflates prices. >> it's a hidden tax. they are paying because shoplifting is ongoing. >> it doesn't mean due process should be taken away. >> re
think mats comply civil underway, a to does not answer to work is going on right now. there's a question in the significant issues are in the midwest due to a variety of factors. in addition to rely on the midwest, the midcontinent iso in the states we need to stay closely involved. >> do you feel like epa is listening to you on these issues because i do because in 2011 when they put out their rule, they include a consultative role for ferc if someone needs a fifth year. i believe that includes not just a fifth year for retrofit but also -- and not just for retrofit but also as they need to figure to bring transmission and before the plan can retire. we voted out a policy statement of how we would handle those. we haven't gotten them yet because it's not far enough along in the process. >> they tell us they're listening to us a lot. sometimes we don't think they are. >> i am very grateful that it comes all the meetings and i'vee a commitment from them that they will continue. but it's something that needs close vigilance. >> i was going to ask you about your priorities. i felt like mr. w
kinds of things. we fought a civil war over this once before, you know, and i just don't think it is right. who --tion would be -- president obama when he severed -- when hed look for sat for 20 years and listen to reverend wright? guest: you know, i'm not quite sure how to answer that question. that there is a lot of variation between the states and the federal systems, and that is really one of the things that we found was that there is so much of a difference between a federal standards and the states, and the states really have so much variation between them. some of them -- the rules are state, soto the you have the separation of powers, you have the state rights. they would have a really unique form and unique standards. i could give examples of your interested. host: sure. guest: in new jersey, they asked the justices to discuss if they own any property in atlantic city. atlantic city geographically the tiny part of new jersey. i guess this came from interest in making sure there were not corruptive influences and gambling. in north carolina, they asked for any -- if any
or throat, or difficulty breathing or swallowing, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a 30-tablet free trial. >> health care manufacturer johnson & johnson will pay to sell civil allegations. >> i expect this from you, johnson, but not you, johnson. to be honest, i have not trusted johnson & johnson since i tried to stop my child's crying with the no more tears shampoo in his eyes. did not work. >> the 113th hasn't passed the bills every congress does like a highway bill or defense bill or farm bill or a budget. what do we need a budget for? clearly not for highways, defense, or food. congress did pass a bill ensuring that people can fish near dams on the cumberland river and also passed deep cuts in food stamps if are the poor which is good solid governing because the poor don't need food stamps anymore now that they can fish near dams on the coupler withland river. >> time to talk about what we learned. we learned a lot. i learned you can catch a munch kin in your mouth if it is delivered right. >> it's not good. really bad
to describe what's going on. because that's part of the problem. so i don't see it as a civil war. i see it as -- i see it as what happens when a party is out of power, and there isn't one unifying voice. if i ask you guys right now, you are knitting over there, who is the leader of the republican party today? [inaudible] >> he's my friend. i would tell him he got one person in new hampshire. [inaudible] >> who do you think is the leader of the party? >> it isn't jon boehner. he has no control over the pulpit or even in the senate look at ted cruz. ted cruz wouldn't say mitch mcconnell is the leader by any means. i think it's just so loose and -- i would like to process a chris christie. >> that's the point. if i went around the sherman act and as everybody who the leader of the republican party is, either we get no answers or 40 different answers. so when you don't have somebody that sets the standard, sets the tone, this happened. people start talking. you start sounding a little dysfunctional like you're suffering from multiple -- multiple personality disorder. that is happening to re
and in the case of boys, toxic in some ways. so i do believe that children need to be civilized, we have to open our hearts and minds and teach them to be caring and considerate human beings, but that does not mean that forcing boys to be exactly like girls is right, it doesn't mean being girls as if they are failing ophelia's at and for the most part, and this is a radical thing to say, most of them are quite healthy. and including most boys. we have to preserve a distinction, which is why sociologists have to do speed have a distinction between healthy masculinity. a young man that displays pathological masculinity, he shows his manhood by being destructive and tearing things apart, just basically -- a reign of terror. and the boy that has been healthy is the opposite. he is the opposite and he builds and he doesn't prey upon people he protects. and i still believe that that is the majority of men that i have known, and if i look at the data, the majority of men in the united states, they are -- they have been displaying healthy masculinity. the boys playing cops and robbers, it's terrible to
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)